Montreal

Alain Magloire's brother satisfied with report calling for better police training

The brother of a man killed by Montreal police says he's satisfied with a coroner's report that calls on officers to be better trained for dealing with the mentally ill.

Coroner wants police to receive more training for dealing with mentally ill

Alain Magloire, 42, was shot and killed by police on Feb. 3, 2014 after he used a hammer to smash a window near the downtown coach bus terminal. (Facebook)

The brother of a man killed by Montreal police says he's satisfied with a coroner's report that calls on officers to be better trained for dealing with the mentally ill. 

Pierre Magloire's brother, Alain, was shot two years ago during a tense confrontation with police near the bus terminal on Berri Street. Alain Magloire, 42, was suffering from a mental illness at the time of his death. 

Coroner Luc Malouin made a total 14 recommendations in his report. They include a call for Montreal police to have more Tasers and for mental-health patients to receive better follow-up care. 

But Pierre Magloire said the most important part of the report is its emphasis on how police deal with people with mental-health issues. 

"That's the major point," Magloire said.

"I think this training is essential, because we have to act differently with mental-health issues. You can't come in guns blazing and start yelling at people who are in crisis." 

Pierre Magloire said he hopes the Quebec government will implement the coroner's recommendations, so his brother won't have died in vain. (CBC)

Though the coroner's report found police did an adequate job during their confrontation with Alain Magloire, it did suggest they could have done a better job of calming the situation.

"The tone used by the officers, yelling at Magloire to drop his hammer, was inappropriate," wrote Malouin. "In a situation where someone has mental illness, you have to defuse the situation."

Pierre Magloire said he hopes the Quebec government will implement the coroner's recommendations, so his brother won't have died in vain.  

"If [Malouin's report] goes on a shelf and stays there and nothing is done, it's going to be senseless," he said. 

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