Manitoba

Unionized trash-collection pilot project goes back to the bargaining table

The City of Winnipeg and its largest union will take another stab at hammering out a deal to collect trash at condos and apartments.

2-year-old effort to allow some city workers to pick up some trash has yet to make financial sense

The city and its largest union are still trying to hammer out a trash-collection deal for condos and apartments. (Terry Stapleton/CBC)

The City of Winnipeg and its largest union will take another stab at hammering out a deal to collect trash at condos and apartments.

City council voted Thursday to put off a decision on a pilot project that would have seen a portion of the city's trash collected by unionized city workers instead of public employees.

The city and the Canadian Union of Public Employees began negotiations in 2018 to launch a pilot project to bring a portion of garbage collection from condominium and apartment buildings in-house.

The city is still awaiting delivery of four garbage trucks it ordered nearly two years ago and has already expanded a garage to hold the vehicles.

The contract to purchase the four trucks is $1.341 million and the city spent $100,000 to expand the garage.

The in-house pilot was supposed to cost no more than private collection, but the numbers have not worked so far.

St. Vital Coun. Brian Mayes, who supported the idea, bristled against the suggestion council is placing ideology above fiscal responsibility.

"I am notoriously thin-skinned, so of course I take some umbrage at the suggestion we're not doing this for the benefit of the taxpayer," Mayes says of the CUPE garbage pilot, eliciting chuckles on the floor of council.

With files from Sean Kavanagh

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