Manitoba

Winnipeg councillor seeks volunteers to find U of M student rooming houses

A Winnipeg city councillor wants volunteers in parts of her ward to go door-to-door and search online to identify homes that are being used as rental properties for University of Manitoba students.

'We're also doing cyber-survelliance — we're basically going to be trolling Kijiji,' Janice Lukes says

South Winnipeg–St. Norbert Coun. Janice Lukes is seeking volunteers in the Fort Richmond and University Heights areas to canvass their streets and help compile an inventory of homes that are being used as rental properties for students. (CBC)

A Winnipeg city councillor wants volunteers in parts of her ward to go door-to-door and search online to identify homes that are being used as rental properties for University of Manitoba students.

South Winnipeg–St. Norbert Coun. Janice Lukes is seeking volunteers in the Fort Richmond and University Heights areas to canvass their streets and help compile "an inventory of assumed rental houses."

"We're also doing cyber-survelliance — we're basically going to be trolling Kijiji and making note of properties that are being rented on Kijiji," she said in an interview Monday.

"All of this will help create an inventory to help us work with the department for bylaw enforcement."

Residences zoned as family houses are being divided and converted into rental rooms for university students in the area, Lukes said.

Some of the converted homes could only be recognized as rooming houses, Lukes has said.

She has warned that someone could be hurt or killed if a fire breaks out in a house that is crammed with students.

Lukes is calling for one or two residents on a given street to knock on doors, ask some questions and record the information on a checklist.

She said she hopes the information gathered by volunteers will help city bylaw officers do their job, and she doesn't believe going door-to-door would overstep the normal boundaries of neighbourly behaviour.

"We're going to knock on the door. If the people don't want to answer the door or they don't want to give the information, that's fine. I mean, there's nothing nothing illegal or overstepping any boundaries there," Lukes said.

"No, it's just asking questions. It's for safety, it's for understanding if bylaws are being broken, if building code is being broken," she added. "It's no different than canvassing in an election."

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now