Manitoba

Artificial Christmas tree to mark 'a new tradition' at Winnipeg city hall

The City of Winnipeg announced on Friday it has purchased a 28-foot artificial tree that will be installed in the courtyard at city hall in the coming weeks.

28-foot tree to be installed in courtyard in coming weeks: spokesperson

Instead of cutting down a live spruce tree to put up in front of city hall, the City of Winnipeg will now put up an artificial tree in the courtyard every year. (Brian Bowman/Twitter)

After announcing it would not be able to continue its annual tradition of putting up a live spruce tree at city hall, the City of Winnipeg has presented a solution.

On Friday, the city announced it has purchased a 28-foot artificial tree that will be installed in the courtyard at city hall in the coming weeks.

"We are pleased to be starting a new tradition," Ken Allen, a communications officer with the City of Winnipeg, said in an email. "This new tree is an economical alternative to a live Christmas tree that can be reused annually for the next decade."

The spokesperson said the city was unable to put up a donated live spruce tree this year like it usually does, because urban forestry crews and equipment needed for the job are still focused on the extensive cleanup of tree debris following October's unprecedented snowstorm.

"The artificial tree can be installed without the use of our urban forestry crews and will still bring the joy and wonder of Christmas to our residents and visitors!" Allen said.

The decades-long tradition typically involved a homeowner donating a tree to go up at city hall. For a tree to be considered, it had to be about 40 to 50 feet tall.

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