Manitoba

A Winnipeg election guide: Where to cast your ballot, what to bring and who you can vote for

Winnipeg residents head to the polls Wednesday to vote for their mayor, city councillors and school trustees — as well as on a contentious question about the city's most famous intersection. Here's what you need to know before you vote.

Wondering what ward you're in, who you can vote for or where to vote? Here's CBC Manitoba's election guide

Winnipeggers will vote for mayor and councillors in 15 city wards on Oct. 24, 2018. (CBC)

Winnipeg residents head to the polls Wednesday to vote for their mayor, city councillors and school trustees — as well as on a contentious question about the city's most famous intersection.

Here's what you need to know to be ready to vote on Oct. 24.

What am I voting on?

Winnipeggers can vote for one of eight nominated candidates for mayor.

You can also vote for the city councillor in your ward.

There are 15 city wards in total, including an entirely new ward (Waverley West) and changes to some other ward boundaries this election (like the elimination of the old St. Charles ward, most of which has become part of a new and larger St. James ward).

As well, you can vote for school trustees. Each of the city's six school divisions is broken down into wards. You can vote for one to four trustees, depending on which ward you live in.

And for the first time since 1983, there will be a plebiscite question on the ballot this year.

On Oct. 24, Winnipeggers will vote 'yes' or 'no' on the question, 'Do you support the opening of Portage and Main to pedestrian crossings?' (Lyzaville Sale/CBC)

Voters will be asked to vote "yes" or "no" on the question, "Do you support the opening of Portage and Main to pedestrian crossings?"

​The result of the plebiscite is non-binding, but at least two mayoral candidates have said they will honour its results if elected.

How do I know which ward I'm in?

You can head to the city's website and search your home address here.

That search will tell you which city council ward you're in, your school division, and which school division ward you're in.

There are 15 wards in the city, including the newly created Waverley West ward. (CBC)

It will also tell you where you can vote on election day.

Who can I vote for?

You can see a full list of nominated candidates for mayor, city councillor and school trustee at the city's website.

Click on CBC Manitoba's ward profiles below to see who's running in your area.

Am I eligible to vote?

To vote for mayor or city councillor, you must be:

  • A Canadian citizen.
  • At least 18 years old on election day.
  • An actual resident or property owner in Winnipeg for a period of at least six months prior to election day (since April 24, 2018).

To vote for a school trustee, you need to be a Canadian citizen, at least 18 years old, and have lived in the school division where you're voting for at least six months prior to election day.

If you're not sure if you're eligible to vote, you can do a search on the city's website. By entering your name, date of birth and address, you can see if you're on the voters list.

If you are on the voters list, you should already have received a voter's notification card by mail, which indicates where you can vote.

What if I'm not on the voters list?

You can't have your name added to the voters list at this point, but you can still vote if you meet the voter eligibility criteria.

You'll need to present your identification and take an oath at the voting place.

What do I need in order to vote?

To cast a ballot, you'll need to bring identification that indicates your name and address.

You only need one piece if you bring government-issued ID that includes your name, address and photo — a valid driver's licence or a Manitoba enhanced identification card are the most common examples.

If you don't have either of those, you can bring any two documents that together show your name and current address. That could include things like your Manitoba Health card, your passport, a utility bill, a credit card statement, an Indian status card, a band membership card or a Métis card.

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