Manitoba

What do voters think of Pat Martin's 'son of a bitch' comment?

​A Green Party candidate is demanding the NDP dump long-time incumbent Pat Martin after he said “son of a bitch” at a debate in Winnipeg on Wednesday.

CBC talked to a few voters in Winnipeg Centre to find out what they thought of the comments

CBC talked to voters in Winnipeg Centre, the riding Pat Martin represents, to find out way they thought about him saying "son of a bitch" at a debate on Wednesday. 0:55

A Green Party candidate is demanding the NDP dump long-time incumbent Pat Martin after he said "son of a bitch" at a debate in Winnipeg on Wednesday.

Martin said the phrase twice after being interrupted by Don Woodstock in a spirited debate.

Woodstock had suggested Martin wasn't providing adequate help to constituents with mental health issues who might visit his office in the inner city.

"You're insulting my staff who work diligently to help people who walk into my office on a regular basis," said Martin. "They have a reputation second to none to providing service to people in this community. You've lived here what, four years in Winnipeg Centre? Well, maybe look into it a bit before you insult my staff."

When Martin was interrupted by Woodstock, who pointed out it was the staff and not Martin who were helping, the incumbent said twice, audibly, "You son of a bitch."

Later, he called Woodstock a "f--king prick," which was picked up on cameras but not by the debate microphones.

Now, Woodstock wants an apology and wants the NDP to dump Martin as a candidate in the riding.

But not everyone agrees the words were such a big deal.

CBC talked to voters in Winnipeg Centre, the riding Martin represents, to find out what they thought about the comments.

Tom Rees said it won't change the way he votes.

"I think that he maybe lost his temper, but what I will say about him is that he has always been a really passionate MP, and I appreciate that a lot about him," he said. "For me, it doesn't change anything. I still think he's the best man for the job."

Voter Brent Mitchell was sitting in the second row when Martin made the comments, but he said he wasn't offended.

"We are all adults. Those kinds of things get said in private conversations, and I don't think there is that big of a deal in public," he said. "The fact they wasted so much time quibbling over – fighting over ridiculous things, that bothers me."

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