Manitoba·Audio

How poutine went from rural delicacy to national icon

With La Poutine Week coming up in Winnipeg, Weekend Morning Show host Nadia Kidwai and Radio-Canada host and producer Samuel Rancourt explore the humble origins of Canada’s most identifiable dish: poutine.

With La Poutine Week coming, CBC host Nadia Kidwai and Radio-Canada's Samuel Rancourt dig into the dish

Doused with gravy and laden with 'squeaky' cheese curds, poutine is Canada's humble delicacy. (Elyse Allard/Radio-Canada)

As we come up on almost one year of COVID-19 pandemic-inspired physical distancing, many Canadians may feel that their life has been reduced to a B-movie comedy, reliving the same moments over and over, all the while disconnected from the outside world.

Staying in, however, presents an opportunity to connect with our neighbours and learn a little more about our vast country and its quirks — including a rich French heritage and its fusion with an ever-evolving Canada. 

As part of a mini-series on CBC Manitoba's Weekend Morning Show called "The Franco-Beat," host Nadia Kidwai and Radio-Canada host and producer Samuel Rancourt explore the humble origins of Canada's most identifiable dish: poutine.

They consider not only traditional ingredients but regional specialities as well. They also explore a traditional Acadian dish, also named poutine, which predates the famous Québécois staple.

In the first part of our new series "The Franco-Beat", we look at the cultural significance of poutine. Radio-Canada host and producer Samuel Rancourt is our guide to French Canadian culture. 11:09

Other stories in the Franco-Beat mini-series:

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Samuel Rancourt is a host and producer with Radio-Canada in Manitoba, as well as a great enthusiast of French Canadian history.

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