Manitoba

Legendary artist, dancers and singers ready to warm your weekend

The weather's getting cooler and the days are getting shorter as the clocks fall back an hour this weekend, but there's plenty happening in Winnipeg with the city's bright talents to warm you up.

CBC personalities offer up ideas for your weekend entertainment calendar

NAfro Dance Productions brings the dead back to life in Return of the Dead. (Leif Norman)

The weather's getting cooler and the days are getting shorter as the clocks fall back an hour this weekend, but there's plenty happening in Winnipeg with the city's bright talents to warm you up.

CBC's trio of personalities offer their ideas for the weekend of Nov. 3-4, which include a local arts legend coming out of retirement for a concert and art opening; a poignant concert about a Manitoba Indigenous hunter/trapper who signs up to fight in the First World War while his country is taking Indigenous children from their homes in an effort to kill their culture; and a dance performance showcasing zombies, mummies and coffins moving to the beat of a plethora of instruments.

Colton Hutchinson's Pick: Heather Bishop at WECC

An iconic voice in Manitoba music history will be back on stage Saturday.

The Art and Music of Heather Bishop is being presented by the West End Cultural Centre, a rare performance and art showcase from the local legend.

Bishop won't be alone on stage, inviting friends Don Benedictson and Laurie MacKenzie to the stage, sure to create a concert to remember at the WECC.

If you're unfamiliar with Heather Bishop's work, the Order of Canada recipient has remained a powerful voice in folk music here in Manitoba and across the country.

Four decades of work has connected Bishop to a wide swath of Canadians, from children (with her appearances on The Fred Penner Show) to LGBTQ communities through her continued social activism.

The art and music of Heather Bishop is a rare performance and art showcase from the local legend. (Heather Bishop)

Bishop is a multi-faceted artist, with a large body of work as a visual artist in addition to her music.

Along with music Saturday night, a range of Bishop's visual art will be showcased and available for sale (at an extremely reasonable price) throughout the evening.

Saturday evening is a rare opportunity for Winnipeg to celebrate and explore one of its most valued artistic voices, in her full effect. Tickets are available in advance at the West End Cultural Centre, Into the Music, Ticketfly, and at the door on Saturday.

Shannah-Lee Vidal's pick: Return of the Dead dance

If you're sad that Halloween is over, I have something for you. This weekend, NAfro Dance Productions will be bringing the dead back to life.

Return of the Dead is a new dance work by Casimiro Nhussi. The show is celebration of life, death and what comes after. Nhussi says the show was inspired by many different world cultures, and their belief that our ancestors are still guiding from beyond the grave.

The program is broken up into different sections, showcasing zombies, mummies and coffins moving to the beat of a plethora of instruments, such as guitar, violin and drums.

Return of the Dead looks at why the dead have come back to life, and whether they are here to help us, or to simply dance once more time. There may be some creepy moments, so a few scenes may be a tad scary for very young children.

Return of the Dead is taking place at the Gas Station Arts Centre, with evening shows on Friday and Saturday, and a matinee on Sunday.

Tickets are available online.

Ismaila Alfa's pick: Camerata Nova​

Camerata Nova and is back with Fallen. It's the second concert in a trilogy that is focused on truth and reconciliation with Indigenous people.

The first concert dealt with the subject of Indigenous children being taken from their homes and being stripped of their culture by residential schools. Called Taken, it premiered in March of 2017 and featured Polaris Prize winner Jeremy Dutcher.

Experience the poignant drama of a Manitoba Indigenous hunter/trapper who signs up to fight in the First World War in Camerata Nova's Fallen. (Camerata Nova)

This current project is the brainchild of Andrew Balfour, a Winnipeg composer of Cree descent. He's the artistic director of Camerata Nova, a collective he created in 1996 to explore early music.

Fallen continues the conversation on truth and reconciliation, this time exploring the contributions of Indigenous soldiers in the First World War.

Camerata Nova will be joined by cellist Cris Derksen, traditional drummer and singer Cory Campbell and the Winnipeg Boys' Choir.

It will be a very moving concert, questioning why Indigenous people would go and fight in the First World War, a war that took them overseas to a bloody conflict, fighting in the name of a country that was doing its best to take Indigenous children from their homes and kill their culture.

Fallen takes place at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday and 3 p.m. on Sunday at Crescent Fort Rouge United Church.

Tickets are available online, at McNally Robinson Booksellers or at the door.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.