Manitoba

1 charged with sexual assault, interference after search in Waywayseecappo First Nation

A 41-year-old man has been charged with sexual assault and sexual interference after police found him hiding in the bush in a Manitoba First Nation.

Police dog released from training in May helped locate suspect in dense bush: police

Waywayseecappo First Nation is located about 280 kilometres northwest of Winnipeg, near Russell, Man. (Riley Laychuk/CBC)

A 41-year-old man has been charged with sexual assault and sexual interference after police found him hiding in the bush in a Manitoba First Nation.

The man was wanted on five outstanding arrest warrants when Manitoba First Nations police went to his home in the First Nation around 5:30 p.m. on Monday, according to a release sent Wednesday.

Officers learned the man had fled the home, and a police dog picked up his scent. Officers tracked the man about 200 metres into an area with dense bush in the community about 280 kilometres northwest of Winnipeg.

"[He] was a little difficult, but he was subdued and taken into custody," MFNPS Insp. Dave Scott said.

The man has been charged with one count each of sexual assault and sexual interference from an alleged incident earlier this year, Scott said Wednesday.

Sexual interference charges are laid when a person is accused of touching person under the age of 16 for sexual purposes, according to the Criminal Code of Canada.

"I know the members have been certainly trying to locate this guy, who's been difficult to locate as he's been elusive," Scott said. "Our canine unit certainly helped in this case."

Scott said he couldn't disclose any information about the victim because of the sensitive nature of the allegations. He said the accused was previously known to police.

The police dog, Ceto, who helped locate the accused is a new member to the Manitoba First Nations Police Service, Scott added. The dog was released from training in May.

"This dog is working. He's active and he's making arrests," Scott said. "That certainly helps us and keeps the community safe."

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