Manitoba

Pallister promises to cut vehicle registration fees if PCs win election

The Progressive Conservatives promised another tax cut on Tuesday as the party positions itself before the election as the one that will reduce taxes on Manitobans.

Promise follows other tax-cut promises from Progressive Conservatives

Progressive Conservative Leader Brian Pallister promises to reverse a $35 vehicle registration fee increase brought in by the previous NDP government in 2012. (Ian Froese/CBC)

The Progressive Conservatives promised another tax cut on Tuesday as the party positions itself before the election as the one that will reduce taxes on Manitobans.

Leader Brian Pallister visited a downtown autobody shop to announce his party would reverse a $35 increase in vehicle registration fees that went into effect in 2012 under the NDP government.

The party said the average cost of passenger vehicle registration in Manitoba is $154.

The move is the latest in a series of tax rollbacks announced by Pallister, who previously said he believes the election campaign should focus on trust and taxes. 

The vehicle registration announcement builds on a pledge the Progressive Conservatives made yesterday that a series of tax savings under their governance would save the average Manitoban $2,020 over four years, but the party has yet to detail how it reached that figure.

Before the campaign began, Pallister pledged to eliminate the provincial sales tax on home insurance, haircuts over $50, professional tax preparation and wills.

Other tax saving measures, such as reducing the PST by one percentage point and the indexing of personal income tax brackets and the basic personal income tax deduction, were implemented during the Progressive Conservatives' first term in government. 

Pallister said it's obvious his government is the only one that would make life more affordable.

"The NDP never saw a tax they didn't like and they never saw a tax they would not hike," Pallister said.

Manitobans will elect a new provincial government on Sept. 10.

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