Manitoba

Winnipeg's Nigerian community makes noise for national basketball team

Winnipeg’s Nigerian community made some noise for their national basketball team when they landed in the city Thursday afternoon.

Team Nigeria arrived Thursday afternoon before pre-World Cup exhibition game

Team Nigeria received a warm and loud welcome in Winnipeg when they arrived Thursday ahead of Friday night's pre-World Cup exhibition game against Canada. A flower girl gave a bouquet to the team's captain, Ike Diogu. (Walther Bernal/CBC)

Winnipeg's Nigerian community made some noise for their national basketball team when they landed in the city Thursday afternoon.

Team Nigeria's arrival at Winnipeg's airport was met with drums, song, dance, hugs, flags and even the presentation of flowers to the team captain. The team will face Canada on Friday in their second exhibition clash in the lead-up to the
FIBA World Cup in China.

"Oh, it was beautiful, man — just the greatest to see all these Nigerians in Winnipeg of all places," said NBA player Al-Farouq Aminu, who plays professionally for the National Basketball Association's Orlando Magic.

"It was beautiful to see. The energy was there, so it was nice."

Team Nigeria's Al-Farouq Aminu, who also plays in the NBA for the Orlando Magic, said he never expected to see such a strong Nigerian community in Winnipeg, of all places. (Walther Bernal/CBC)

The team and their coach, Alexander Nwora, gathered with dozens from Winnipeg's Nigerian community in the lobby of the Richardson airport to dance, take photos and meet face-to-face.

"I didn't think there'd be this much of a population of Nigerians, so it's kind of cool to see," said Aminu. 

Both he and his teammate Ike Iroegbu said Canada has provided stiff opposition in their exhibition series. Wednesday's score in Toronto was 96-87 for Canada, but the players said they'll be reviewing the tape and fixing their mistakes.

"We played them good yesterday. I feel like if we're smarter with the basketball and do things a little differently we'll probably win that game. So we take care of that tomorrow," said Iroegbu.

Team Nigeria was greeted the moment they stepped off the escalator. (Walther Bernal/CBC)

"We are so excited and we're rooting for them," said Grace Kyoon-Achan, vice-president of the Nigerian Association of Manitoba, who was at the airport.

She said many in the Nigerian community also have Canadian citizenship, so they'll be rooting for everybody.

"We are people who are alive," agreed Titi Tijani, president of the African Communities of Manitoba Incorporated. "What we saw here at the airport was very, very small. We celebrate loudly and we expect to do that tomorrow." 

Wilson Akinwale, publicity secretary of the Nigerian Association of Manitoba, said his organization has been planning for this event for months, working with True North Sports and Entertainment, tracking the D'Tigers, the team's nickname, from the Dominican Republic to Toronto and now Winnipeg, getting shirts made for fans showing a Nigerian and Canadian flag combined, and setting aside two sections of Bell MTS Place for Nigerian fans.

Winnipeg's Nigerian community rocked the beats for their national basketball team. (Walther Bernal/CBC)

"We want Manitobans and Winnipeggers tomorrow to watch out for our section of 221 and 222," he said. 

"Tomorrow we're going to have Nigerians in thousands. The population is growing in Manitoba and a lot of people have bought tickets."

Ayodele Odeyemi, who came to Canada from Nigeria five years ago, is one of the fans who welcomed the team.

"It is something so exciting to see players … coming to represent their fatherland, which is Nigeria, and also Canada," he said.

"I can't wait till tomorrow. It's going to be a fun day."

Ike Iroegbu, who plays for Nigeria, said it's an honour to represent his country. (Walther Bernal/CBC)

Kevin Donnelly, senior vice-president of venues and entertainment for True North Sports and Entertainment, said there are still some seats available for Friday's game, which tips off at 7 p.m. at Bell MTS Place.

"We're hoping for a lower bowl sellout, so 8,000 people," he said. 

For the Nigerian players, a big crowd will only add to the pride they feel in wearing their country's colours.

"It's a great honour, when you can represent a whole country, it's a great responsibility and it means a lot to your family," said Iroegbu.

"It's not even about the name on your back — it's always about the name on the front of the jersey, so it's a huge honour and we take it very seriously," he said.

"Shout out to Nigeria, shout out to every Nigerian, just trying to make some noise for them, and that's what we plan on doing," said Aminu.

The team took photos with some of Winnipeg's Nigerian community who came to greet them. (Walther Bernal/CBC)