Manitoba

Snowmobiler died trying to save friend

Friends and family of Chad Temple, the Manitoba man killed in a snowmobile accident in B.C. on Monday, describe him as generous and giving.

Friends and family of Chad Temple, the Manitoba man killed in a snowmobile accident in B.C. on Monday, describe him as generous and giving.

The 30-year-old died after being caught in a small avalanche while riding in the mountains near Sicamous, B.C., late Monday evening.

Temple is originally from Waskada, Man., but had lived in Sylvan Lake, Alta., for a number of years.

He was in the B.C. Interior snowmobiling with a buddy from Alberta.

Police said on Wednesday that Temple was trying to help his friend when he died.

The friend's snowmobile somehow became stuck prior to the avalanche, RCMP Sgt. Carl Vinet said.

The friend suffered two broken legs and had to be airlifted out of the area for treatment at a Kamloops hospital. The man's name has not been released.

Two other friends were not hurt and managed to drive out of the area on their snowmobiles.

Temple's body was recovered by rescue crews on Tuesday night.

Selflessness was typical for Temple, who always made time to help others, Dawn Rieger-Wood wrote in an email to CBC News on Wednesday. "Chad was an amazing man. He was incredibly smart, witty and had a fantastic sense of humour. He was a friend to all who knew him," she said.

All men experienced riders, police say

RCMP said on Tuesday that it appeared Temple and his friend were slammed into some trees when snow sloughed off the mountain they were riding on and came rushing at them.

"Snow probably pushed them into trees and that's probably what caused their injuries," Cpl. Dan Moskaluk said.

RCMP said Temple and the other three men he was with were experienced snowmobile riders who were familiar with the area.

They were all wearing proper equipment and were appropriately dressed, police said.

Temple's family declined to be interviewed on Tuesday night after receiving news of his death, saying they were too distraught.

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