Manitoba

Winnipeggers protest 'cash-grab' tickets around school zones

A group of Winnipeg traffic-ticket fighters hit the streets Monday calling for an end to enforcing school speed zones when students aren’t in class, and to give drivers a better warning to slow down.

Group, mayoral candidate call for better speed zone warnings, ending low speed limits on holidays

About a dozen Wise Up Winnipeg members were protesting at Panet Road and Munroe Avenue Monday, calling for better school zone speed limit warnings and an end to enforcing the zones on holidays. (Travis Golby/CBC)

A group of Winnipeg traffic-ticket fighters hit the streets Monday, calling for an end to enforcing school speed zones when students aren't in class, and asking the city to give drivers a better warning to slow down. 

About a dozen WiseUp Winnipeg members were out protesting at Panet Road and Munroe Avenue, using yellow signs warning drivers of photo radar surveillance.

WiseUp Winnipeg founder Todd Dube said the yellow signs represent the yellow flashing lights the group thinks should be installed to warn drivers of the speed limit change.

Wise Up Winnipeg's Todd Dube said the protesters are meant to mimic the flashing lights the group thinks should be installed around school zones to warn drivers. (Travis Golby/CBC)

"I mean, the people getting these tickets … they're as surprised as anybody to learn they were speeding," he said.

"If the city wants to have such a ridiculously low speed limit, at least give the public what they expect, and that is a really clear warning that they're entering one."

Mayoral candidate Jenny Motkaluk was among the protesters Monday, after making a pair of campaign pledges focused on the issue last week. (Travis Golby/CBC)

Mayoral candidate Jenny Motkaluk was also at the event, after pledging to both install the flashing yellow lights and end the practice of enforcing school speed zones during holiday weekdays.

"The reason Winnipeggers think it's a cash-grab is because it kind of is. And this is why we need to put a stop to it," she said.

Teacher Marlene Schroder was making her way through the area Monday, and said she's gotten a school-zone speeding ticket before. Because she knew there was no school, she said she assumed the speed limit wasn't in effect. 

At the time, she said it seemed unfair and was quite frustrating. 

"But I respect the fact they're trying to protect our kids," she said. 

Bob Scott, who was also travelling near the school zone on Monday, said he always slows down near schools, after previously getting a ticket.

"I got nailed once, I ain't getting nailed again," he said.

With files from Marianne Klowak

A group of Winnipeg traffic-ticket fighters hit the streets Monday, calling for an end to enforcing school speed zones when students aren't in class, and asking the city to give drivers a better warning to slow down. 2:08