Manitoba

Norway House gets fresh green boost from a shipping container

A shipping container with 1,800 planting holes is filling shelves in a Norway House store with local produce.

Hydroponic shipping container fills gaps for produce items that are harder to keep in supply

The hydroponic shipping container is currently growing lettuce, like the crop pictured here, as well as kale, bok choi, spinach and four different types of herbs. (Pat Martel/CBC)

A shipping container with 1,800 planting holes is filling shelves in a Norway House store with fresh greens.

On June 6, a Northern Store started selling produce grown by Ian Maxwell and Virginia Muswagon in a garden centre in Norway House called Life Water Gardens.

The hydroponic shipping container uses LED lights that turn on and off on their own, a water level and filtration system, and automated nutrient dosing to grow plants indoors throughout the year. It's all part of an effort to bring food stability to the community of about 5,000 people that is 450 kilometres by air north of Winnipeg.

"It could be 52 below zero and they still grow just the same. It's that high-tech," said Maxwell.

Maxwell and Muswagon get notifications on their phones in real time if the container is too humid or hot so they can come fix the temperature levels in person.

Read more from the Winnipeg Free Press by clicking here.


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