500 students lay poppies on military graves at Transcona Cemetery

Students from eight Winnipeg schools participated in No Stone Left Alone, an initiative that has middle school students honour the sacrifices the Canadian military makes.

No Stone Left Alone has middle school students honour fallen soldiers ahead of Remembrance Day

Hundreds of students pack the Transcona Cemetery Monday morning to lay poppies on the graves of fallen soldiers. (CBC)

Hundreds of students packed the Transcona Cemetery Monday morning to lay poppies on the graves of fallen soldiers.

More than 500 students from eight Winnipeg schools participated in No Stone Left Alone, an initiative that has middle school students honour the sacrifices of the Canadian military. 
Jordyn Smith, a student at École Regent Park, laid a poppy on a veteran's headstone on Monday. (CBC)

"We stood by a grave and said thank you to our veteran, and we put our poppy down and sang O Canada," said Jordyn Smith, a student at École Regent Park. "It was very sad, but it was very important to go and say thank you because they fought for our country so we could be safe."

Smith's father served in Afghanistan as a combat engineer, so Smith has a personal understanding about the sacrifices veterans make, she said.

An Afghanistan veteran and members of the 38 Canadian Brigade Group were also in attendance for the ceremony.

No Stone Left Alone ceremonies are planned across Canada until Remembrance Day, with hundreds more students expected to play poppies on military headstones in Canadian fields of honour.
Hundreds of students packed the Transcona Cemetery Monday morning to lay poppies on the graves of fallen soldiers. More than 500 students from eight Winnipeg schools participated in No Stone Left Alone, an initiative that has middle school students honour the sacrifices of the Canadian military. 0:35