Manitoba

National inquiry on missing, murdered women not on horizon

There's still no sign of the federal government agreeing to hold a national inquiry into missing and murdered women.
Bouquets of flowers form the shape of a butterfly on the steps of the Manitoba legislature Oct. 4 as part of a vigil remembering missing and murdered aboriginal women in the province. (Meagan Fiddler/CBC)

There's still no sign of the federal government agreeing to hold a national inquiry into missing and murdered women.

Yesterday, federal First Nations Minister Bernard Valcourt met with his provincial counterparts.

They and national aboriginal groups reiterated their demand for an inquiry.

But Michele Taina Audette, head of the Native Women's Association of Canada, says Valcourt showed no sign of bending to the request.

She says Valcourt told the group the government does not think an inquiry would solve anything.

The provincial and territorial ministers also said they would continue to press Ottawa for help in improving economic opportunities and high school graduation rates for First Nations.

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