Manitoba

Metres-deep snow makes for slow going for moose in Riding Mountain National Park

Manitobans of all description have been digging themselves out of the winter storm from earlier this week, including a persistent moose in Riding Mountain National Park that went on with its day despite several feet of snow.

'It kind of blew my mind,' Onanole resident says of snow

Metres-deep snow in Riding Mountain National Park makes it hard work for animal residents to get around. (CBC)

Manitobans of all description have been digging themselves out of the winter storm from earlier this week, including a persistent moose in Riding Mountain National Park that went on with its day despite several feet of snow.

Melanie Robinson caught the moose on video just south of Moon Lake as it trudged its way through snow drifts one- to two-metres high on Thursday.

"We were driving past and we saw this moose on the road, and I just couldn't believe how much snow he was actually pushing through — like, up to his belly," she said.

Robinson said she's never seen this much snow this early in the year in her hometown of Onanole.

"Even in Onanole, I had no idea how much snow was up in the park," she said. "It kind of blew my mind."

While it's hard work and slow going for some of the province's wildlife, Robinson says the snow means winter fun for humans.

While snowshoeing in the park on Saturday, Robinson said she saw another moose and a deer on the road, and thinks the animals are trying to dodge snowdrifts by hitting the highways. 

"They're hanging out on the highway. I just hope that people are driving carefully and watching out, because they've got a long winter ahead of them and will be trying to take the easy way, which is the highway," she said.

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