Manitoba

Marymound attracts more than 1,000 people to Indigenous culture celebration

More than 1,000 people gathered at Marymound School on Wednesday to celebrate First Nations and Metis culture.

More than 1,000 people celebrate Indigenous culture at Marymound’s annual event

More than 1,000 people gathered at Marymound School on Wednesday to celebrate First Nations and Metis culture. 0:47

More than 1,000 people gathered at Marymound School on Wednesday to celebrate First Nations and Metis culture.

Marymound works with at-risk youth, and each year, it devotes a day to celebrating Aboriginal culture.

This year, they had a pow wow, drum groups, a free BBQ with a traditional feast, games, pony rides, crafts and more.

Ali Fontaine, an Anishinaabe singer-songwriter, performed Wednesday, along with Boogey the Beat.

The event runs until 6 p.m. on Wednesday and is open to the public.

 "It's our chance to really show our honour and respect for the Aboriginal culture," said Jay Rodgers, Marymound's CEO. "It's so important because a lot of the kids we serve are of Indigenous descent, and so, respecting that culture and building relationships with Indigenous leaders and agencies is important to us."

More than 70 per cent of the young people who use Marymound's services are of First Nations or Metis descent, and Marymound has a year-long Indigenious culture program that includes traditional teachings, ceremonies, sweat lodges, regalia-making and drum groups. 
Marymound's celebration included a pow wow, drum groups and a traditional feast. (CBC)