Manitoba

Maps of Winnipeg show spread of income, ethnicity and languages

New maps of Winnipeg are allowing people to see the city is a new light – comparing income distribution, ethnicity and languages – and how they're spread across the city.

The maps were originally created as Christmas presents for the family of the map maker's girlfriend

Each coloured dot on the map represents an individual person and the data available about them through Winnipeg's open data. (Bert Savard/CBC)

New maps of Winnipeg are allowing people to see the city is a new light – comparing income distribution, ethnicity and languages – and how they're spread across the city. 

Ed Manley, a lecturer at University College London, was toying around with Winnipeg's census information last fall and the result is series of technicolor mosaics that tell the story of our city.

Each coloured dot on the map represents an individual person and the data available about them through Winnipeg's open data.

Manley used GIS software – or geographic information systems – to match the dots to the census data. 

"You actually really get a good sense of the concentrations across the city," Manley told CBC's Information Radio. "You do get a sense of difference as you walk around Winnipeg for sure but it was interesting to see that come out on the screen."

"You do get a sense of communities forming in certain areas of Winnipeg," he added.

Manley said there is lots of other data sets he could have used to make the maps but that these factors were interesting variables to look at, especially to look at them together and compare them and see where the correlations are. 

The British lecturer was interested in Winnipeg because it is where his girlfriend calls home. When he was trying to come up with Christmas-present ideas, he decided to use his talents to give them something unique. 

"Because I'm interested in map making and interested in creating new maps from new data sets," Manley said, "I though 'hey, why not use my skills to create some Christmas gifts?'"


Hear the full interview with Ed Manley on CBC Radio One's Information Radio, Tuesday at 6:45 a.m. 

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

now