Manitoba

More vaccine cards on order for Manitoba following 'overwhelming demand' for physical version

Manitobans can still request both digital and physical cards for proof of vaccination, the province says. The digital version will be available for use right away, while the physical ones will be mailed out as soon as supplies are available.

Digital cards available immediately, while physical ones will be mailed as soon as they’re available

A nurse is pictured filling a syringe with a COVID-19 vaccine. Fully immunized Manitobans will still be able to request digital proof of their shots, but they'll have to wait if they want the physical card, the province says. (Thomas Lohnes/AFP/Getty Images)

Manitobans who want physical proof of their COVID-19 vaccinations may have to wait a few weeks.

The province says it expects to start printing vaccine cards again later this month, once an order of more cards arrives.

The shortage is linked to an "overwhelming demand" for the physical immunization card in Manitoba and an overall demand in the industry for blank cards, the province said in its vaccine bulletin on Friday afternoon.

People can still request both digital and physical cards for proof of vaccination, the release said.

The digital version will be available for use right away, while the physical ones will be mailed out as soon as supplies are available.

To be considered fully immunized, people need two doses of an approved COVID-19 vaccine. The doses can be the same vaccine brand or two different ones.

Immunized Manitobans can request their proof of vaccination two weeks after their second dose. More information about how to get one is available on the province's website.

A total of 1,571,112 vaccine doses have now been recorded in Manitoba, the release said.

As of Friday, 55.2 per cent of Manitobans age 12 and up had gotten two doses of COVID-19 vaccine, while 75.9 per cent had received at least one, the province's online vaccine dashboard says.

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