Video

Manitoba snowboarders, skiers make a splash at Slush Cup

On a day that saw parts of southern Manitoba double its historical highs for March 15, a wet and wild spring event took place earlier than usual at Stony Mountain Ski Area Sunday.

Stony Mountain Ski Area hosts annual season-closing event earlier than usual due to historic highs

On a day that saw parts of southern Manitoba double its historical highs for March 15, a wet and wild spring event took place earlier than usual at Stony Mountain Ski Area Sunday. 0:54

On a day that saw parts of southern Manitoba double the province's historical highs for March 15, a wet and wild spring event took place earlier than usual at Stony Mountain Ski Area.

The Slush Cup takes place every year at the base of a Stony Mountain’s bunny hill run.

Skiers and snowboarders bomb down the hill before gliding across the surface of an open water pit. Some manage to skip their way from end to end; others make a splash and end up having to pull themselves out of the chilly water.

      1 of 0
      Heather Dewar, an organizer with the Splash Cup, said despite the historical highs, there was still enough powder to host the event this year.

      “The kids basically pond skim, try and go across it on their skis or snowboard, and they keep going until they really get soaking wet,” said Dewar. “We have prizes for the biggest splash and best trick and we've got some Oakley sunglasses and dry socks and different things for them.”

      Robert Page with the Stony Mountain ski patrol said there were mixed emotions on the hill Sunday. The warm weather spells the end of the season for winter recreation lovers.

      “It’s kind of the end of the season wrap up. We do this and everyone comes out enjoys the last day of skiing,” said Page.

      “Kind of mixed emotions. We have the cold, we love the snow and skiing all year, but summer is around the corner,  so we mix in skiing and swimming at the same time.”

      Over 100 skiers and snowboarders typically show up for the Splash Cup every year.

      Comments

      To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

      By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.