Manitoba

Manitoba's population grew by 2,658 people in third quarter of 2021

Manitoba experienced relatively strong population growth during the third quarter of 2021, as a renewed influx of international immigrants offset migration to other provinces.

Renewed immigration offset out-migration to Alberta, B.C. and other provinces

A cold morning in Winnipeg, as seen from the Slaw Rebchuk Bridge. Manitoba's population grew by 2,528 people during the third quarter of this year. (Tyson Koschik/CBC)

Manitoba experienced relatively strong population growth during the third quarter of 2021, as a renewed influx of international immigrants offset migration to other provinces.

The Manitoba Bureau of Statistics estimates there were 1,386,333 people living in this province as of Oct. 1, according to a report published Dec. 16.

That's a rise of 2,658 people in July, August and September alone. That growth made up almost half of Manitoba's population increase for the entire 12-month period ending Oct. 1.

The provincial population grew by 5,886 people from Oct. 1, 2020 to the same date this year.

Reduced international travel and border closures due to COVID-19 mitigation measures led to reduced immigration to Manitoba, which saw a drastic drop in international arrivals in 2020, the first year of the pandemic. Net immigration to Manitoba was 8,628 in 2020, a 54-per-cent drop from 2019.

Things are looking up in terms of immigration in 2021. Net immigration in the third quarter of this year alone was 4,218 people, according to the statistics bureau.

Immigrants and other international arrivals helped offset a net loss of Manitobans to other provinces. Net migration to other provinces — that is, the number of people moving here vs. moving out — was a loss 3,877 people during the third quarter of 2021.

The top three destinations for Manitobans who left for other provinces in July, August and September were Alberta, B.C. and Ontario.

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