Manitoba

Manitoba may sell its flood-fighting ice-breaking machines

The Manitoba government is considering selling off its Amphibex ice-breaking machines that help prevent ice jams and floods on the Red River north of Winnipeg. Infrastructure Minister Ron Schuler says the government is simply seeing if a better deal is available on the open market.

Province wondering if better deal exists for Amphibex ice-breaking machines

An Amphibex crawls across and crushes Red River ice near Selkirk in March. (Tyson Koschik/CBC)

The Manitoba government is considering selling off its Amphibex ice-breaking machines that help prevent ice jams and floods on the Red River north of Winnipeg.

The province owns three of the machines and has them run by a corporation set up by three municipalities, under a contract that costs more than $1 million a year.

Infrastructure Minister Ron Schuler says the government is simply seeing if a better deal is available on the open market.

He says the aim is to get the best service contract possible, and that contract could involve someone leasing or buying the Amphibexes outright.

The Opposition New Democrats say they are worried privately-owned Amphibexes might not be available when they are needed during spring flood season.

Schuler says if the Amphibexes are sold, the new contractor would be legally required to have them ready and available when needed

Amphibex ice-breakers: How they work

CBC News Manitoba

2 years ago
1:01
Amphibex ice-breakers use a series of specialized components to crush through river ice every spring to help reduce the likelihood of ice jams and flooding. 1:01

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