Manitoba

Lockdown saving lives, top doc says, as Manitobans asked to weigh in on 'cautious' lift of restrictions

Broad public health restrictions brought in over the past two months likely saved roughly 1,700 lives since Nov. 12, when the province first moved to red-level rules, Manitoba's chief public health officer said Friday.

Current public health orders set to expire on Jan. 22 after months-long partial lockdown

Manitoba's current public health orders are set to expire on Jan. 22. On Friday, the province launched an online survey about the next stage of COVID-19 restrictions. (Tyson Koschik/CBC)

Manitoba's partial lockdown is saving lives, provincial officials say, as they prepare the public for a "cautious and slow" reopening to come.

Broad public health restrictions brought in over the past two months likely saved an estimated 1,700 lives since Nov. 12, when the province first moved to red-level rules, Dr. Brent Roussin, Manitoba's chief public health officer, said at a news conference Friday.

"We've lost many Manitobans and our hearts go out to those families. But we can see from our restrictions we've saved many more," Roussin said.

"This virus does not discriminate and certainly our lives cannot return to normal at this point."

WATCH | Manitoba wants to know what you think about easing pandemic restrictions:

'This can't be and this won't be a fast return to normal'

CBC News Manitoba

2 months ago
1:31
Manitoba's partial lockdown is saving lives, provincial officials say, as they prepare the public for a "cautious and slow" reopening to come. 1:31

Roussin's estimate is based on the trajectory the province was on in early November, he said. In recent weeks, the province has seen test positivity rates decline, daily case counts improve and the numbers of COVID-19 patients hospitalized gradually decreasing.

But Roussin said any loosening of restrictions will be "very cautious and slow."

Manitoba's current public health orders are set to expire on Jan. 22. On Friday, the province launched an online survey about the next stage of COVID-19 restrictions, Premier Brian Pallister announced at the news conference.

WATCH | Manitoba's strict lockdown measures saved lives, top doctor says:

Code red restrictions saved estimated 1,700 lives, says Manitoba's top doctor

CBC News Manitoba

2 months ago
0:57
Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Brent Roussin said modelling data suggests Manitoba's code red restrictions that came into effect in November saved an estimated 1,700 lives between Nov. 12 and Jan. 3. 0:57

The survey will ask the public questions about their perspective on the risk of the virus, COVID-19 vaccines and how comfortable they are with various activities.

The survey will also ask about the public's priorities for reopening, including possible increases to indoor and outdoor gathering sizes and possible changes to expand in-person shopping and reopening various businesses.

Pallister said the province expects to float some recommendations for possible changes to the public health orders early next week.

Changes announced to the rules will ultimately be guided by public health experts, he said. However, Pallister said a public survey is a good tool to let Manitobans voice their thoughts and build public buy-in.

"If they impact on people, then people should have a chance to see what they are, so they can make sure that they're abiding by those changes if there are changes recommended by Dr. Roussin," Pallister said.

WATCH | Premier implores Manitobans to consider life-saving intent of restrictions:

Premier implores Manitobans to consider life-saving intent of restrictions

CBC News Manitoba

2 months ago
1:30
Brian Pallister said Friday that those considering breaking COVID-19 rules now should consider how they will look back on those decisions in the future. 1:30

The online survey includes multiple sections educating Manitobans on what's known about COVID-19 and how to slow its spread, prior to posing sets of questions.

In one section, the site notes the virus spreads most easily in close-contact settings, crowded places and closed spaces, It adds that elderly people are especially vulnerable and seven per cent of people who get sick will need to be hospitalized.

On another page, the survey includes a description of Manitoba's second wave of the pandemic, including soaring cases, strain on the health-care system and cancellations of non-emergency surgeries.

Some questions in the survey ask respondents to rank various possible changes to the rules in order of preference. (Screenshot/EngageMB.ca)

The survey asks Manitobans to answer multiple questions about their thoughts on the pandemic response and preferences for reopening.

In one question, respondents are asked to say how comfortable they'd be in various situations, like going to a restaurant, the gym or the mall, or taking public transit.

In others, they're asked to rank priorities for changes, with options like increasing gathering sizes, reopening retail and increasing access to recreational activities and sports for youth.

"When we restore services, we hope to restore them for good," the text reads in one section. "We should avoid a yo-yo experience, moving in and out of restrictions going forward."

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