Manitoba

Manito Ahbee Festival begins in Winnipeg with lighting of sacred fire

The Indigenous culture festival runs until Sunday night and includes a music conference, youth education day, art expo and the largest powwow in Canada.

Festival includes music, art and the largest powwow in Canada

The Indigenous festival runs until Sunday night and includes a music conference, youth education day and art expo. 0:44

The 2016 Manito Ahbee Festival kicked off in Winnipeg on Wednesday with the lighting of a scared fire.

People gathered to watch the ceremony at the Oodena Circle at The Forks, where tobacco was offered to the flames.

The 2016 Manito Ahbee Festival began on Wednesday with sacred fire offerings. (Bert Savard/CBC)

The Indigenous festival runs until Sunday night and includes a music conference, youth education day and art expo.

On Friday there will also be a concert featuring performances by Western Canadian Music Awards nominee William Prince, Stoney Park Drum Group, Dee Erin Band and Juno Award winner Susan Aglukark.

There was a showcase of music and dance at the sacred fire ceremony at the Oodena Circle at The Forks. (Bert Savard/CBC)
On Saturday and Sunday, more than 800 dancers will head to the RBC Convention Centre for the Manito Ahbee International Pow Wow, the largest powwow in Canada.

The name Manito Ahbee was given to the festival through a ceremony to recognize one of the most important traditional Indigenous gathering sites in North America, the festival's website says.

"The Manito Ahbee site is located in the western Whiteshell area of Manitoba, and marks the location where the Creator makes his home," the website says.
The festival runs until Sunday night and includes a music conference, youth education day and an art expo. (Bert Savard/CBC)