Manitoba

Medevac plane badly damaged during emergency landing at Gillam, Man.

No one was injured when a medevac flight attempting an emergency landing touched down on an icy lake just short of the runway at Gillam Airport in northern Manitoba Wednesday night, the RCMP said Thursday.

No one hurt when Beechcraft King Air 200 landed on frozen lake just short of runway: RCMP

The medevac flight lost its landing gear in the emergency landing at Gillam, Man. (Manitoba RCMP)

No one was injured when a medevac flight landed on a frozen lake just short of the runway at Gillam Airport in northern Manitoba around 7 p.m. Wednesday, the RCMP said Thursday.

However, the Beechcraft Super King Air 200 suffered heavy damage when it landed on ice at Stephens Lake, the Mounties said.

The Keewatin Air medevac flight was carrying two pilots and two paramedics to Churchill from Winnipeg when they declared an emergency while passing Gillam, RCMP said. There were no injuries, but all those aboard were taken to hospital as a precaution, police said.

"The flight landed short of the runway and came to a rest near the runway threshold," said Eric Collard, a Transportation Safety Board spokesperson. "It seems there was a partial landing gear collapse and substantial damage to the aircraft."

Gillam is about 740 kilometres north of Winnipeg. (Google Maps)

TSB investigators from Winnipeg were headed to the town 740 kilometres north of the Manitoba capital on Thursday. Gillam RCMP are also investigating.

Collard said TSB officials don't yet know what emergency prompted the plane to land at Gillam, an airport that has a single gravel runway.

The airport at Gillam, which is just south of Stephens Lake, has a single gravel runway. (Google Satellite Image)

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada investigates aviation, marine, pipeline and railway incidents in Canada with the goal of improving safety.

The plane landed on lake ice and came to a stop just short of the Gillam Airport runway, RCMP say. (Manitoba RCMP)

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