Manitoba

ISIS supporter Aaron Driver's charter challenge delayed

Although Driver is not accused of any crime, federal authorities are trying to limit his activities on the suspicion that he might help or engage in terrorist activities.

Authorities trying to limit Driver's activities on suspicion he might engage in terror activities

A charter challenge by a Winnipeg man suspected of planning terrorist activities has been delayed 2:02

A charter challenge by a Winnipeg man suspected of planning terrorist activities has been delayed.

Aaron Driver, 23, attended court Tuesday but the matter was remanded until July 20.

Although Driver is not accused of any crime, federal authorities are trying to limit his activities on the suspicion that he might help or engage in terrorist activities.

Driver, who has launched a challenge under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, sat in court Tuesday quietly reading the Qur'an while lawyers discussed the case.

Watched by CSIS

Driver caught the attention of CSIS, Canada's spy agency, in October 2014 when he was tweeting support for the militant group ISIS under the alias Harun Abdurahman.

That activity landed him on a watch list.

Aaron Driver arrives at the courthouse in Winnipeg on Tuesday morning. (CBC)
He was arrested by RCMP on June 4 and investigators searched his Charleswood-area home, removing his custom-made computer, phone, flash drives and Qur'an.

Although he has not been charged with anything, investigators have invoked a section of Canada's Criminal Code and are seeking a peace bond to limit Driver's activities.

He is currently free on bail after agreeing to abide by 19 conditions, which include wearing a GPS device at all times.

He must also stay in Winnipeg, possess no computers, own no objects with Islamic State logos or slogans and avoid social media.

Public concern

Corey Shefman, president of the Manitoba  Association for Rights and Liberties, was also in court to support Driver.

He told reporters afterwards that the limitations placed on Driver are a violation of his rights and should be of great public concern.
Corey Shefman, president of the Manitoba Association for Rights and Liberties, speaks to reporters outside the courthouse in Winnipeg on Tuesday. (Pierre Verriere/CBC)

"If Mr. Driver had done something wrong or has done something wrong, he should be charged with a crime," Shefman said.

"But until he's charged with a crime, he shouldn't be [treated like he's been] charged with a crime because he's no different than any other law abiding Canadian citizen."

Shefman said this will be a precedent-setting case and the association is applying for intervener status in when the case returns to court on July 20.

With files from the Canadian Press

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