Manitoba

Hockey Winnipeg sues former executive director over alleged fraud, theft

Hockey Winnipeg is suing its former executive director after he allegedly made tens of thousands of dollars worth of fraudulent charges on the association’s corporate credit card and transferred money to himself and his roommate.

Andrew Skogen used corporate credit card to buy concert tickets, alcohol, computer services, lawsuit alleges

Hockey Winnipeg is suing its former executive director, alleging he stole tens of thousands of dollars from the organization. (Shutterstock)

Hockey Winnipeg is suing its former executive director after he allegedly made tens of thousands of dollars worth of fraudulent charges on the association's corporate credit card and transferred money to himself and his roommate.

In a statement of claim filed in Winnipeg Court of Queen's Bench on March 6, 2018, Hockey Winnipeg — also known as the Winnipeg Minor Hockey Association — alleges the money was used to pay for alcohol, gasoline, automobile repairs, computer services, taxis, groceries, concerts, hockey tickets, streaming services, and expenses at restaurants, bars, hotels and lounges.

It is seeking $54,447.93 from Andrew Skogen, who served as executive director from Aug. 14, 2017 to Feb. 22, 2018.

The statement says Skogen had "a specific duty not to use the Hockey Winnipeg corporate credit card for any personal expenditures whatsoever."

CBC News repeatedly spoke to Skogen asking for comment on the allegations. He told CBC he would have a statement ready by Wednesday morning, but none was received. He did not respond to further attempts to follow up.

The credit card charges cited in the claim add up to $40,777.93. Skogen allegedly used the products and services "for his sole use and enjoyment," the statement says.

Skogen also allegedly made a series of e-transfers worth a total of $13,670 from Hockey Winnipeg's bank account to himself and his roommate, who is not named in the statement, and who the statement says "provided no services or any value whatsoever to Hockey Winnipeg."

None of the allegations have been proven in court.

Hockey Winnipeg president Chris Hall told CBC News he could not comment on the lawsuit.

A spokesperson for the Winnipeg Police Service said police are aware of the allegations and an investigation is in its preliminary stages, but no charges have been laid.

Hockey Winnipeg says the charges and transfers were made between Aug. 17, 2017, just days after he started working, until Feb. 21, 2018, one day before he was fired.

The balance on Hockey Winnipeg's corporate credit card was automatically debited out of the association's Bank of Montreal chequing account.

"When BMO's monthly credit card statements and chequing account statements would arrive at Hockey Winnipeg, Skogen routinely took possession of them to the exclusion of all other employees," the statement says.

Hockey Winnipeg is seeking the full amount of the credit card purchases and e-transfers plus interest, as well as punitive damages, legal costs and any other damages the court decides to award.

Skogen has not yet filed a statement of defence.