Manitoba·Analysis

Fort Whyte voting map shows where PCs and Liberals split the byelection vote

A poll-by-poll breakdown of the votes in the Fort Whyte byelection shows how the Progressive Conservatives barely hung on to what was supposed to be one of the party's safest Manitoba seats.

Liberals claimed Linden Woods, while PCs did better in Whyte Ridge

Obby Khan with his son, Sufiyan Morrish-Khan, as he celebrates his victory in the Fort Whyte byelection. (Ian Froese/CBC)

A poll-by-poll breakdown of the votes in the Fort Whyte byelection shows how the Progressive Conservatives barely hung on to what was supposed to be one of the party's safest Manitoba seats.

On March 22, Progressive Conservative Obby Khan slipped past Liberal Willard Reaves by a 197-vote margin to allow the Tories to retain the seat vacated in 2021 by former premier Brian Pallister.

The PCs had won Fort Whyte in every election since the constituency was created in 1999.

Up until last week, the PCs had never captured less than 52 per cent of the vote in Fort Whyte.

Khan won the constituency with only 43 per cent of the vote as he edged past Reaves, who earned 40 per cent.

Advance polls, which favoured the PCs, handed Khan his victory. Without that advantage, Reaves likely would have stolen the riding for the Liberals by a tiny margin.

This poll-by-poll map shows how that election-day vote broke down.

(CBC News)

Reaves won the most of the voting areas in Linden Woods, while Khan did better in the Whyte Ridge and Linden Ridge neighbourhoods.

New Democratic Party candidate Trudy Schroeder only won two polls, both of them made up of higher-density multiple-family dwellings.

Independent candidate Patrick Allard and Green candidate Nicolas Geddert did not win any voting areas.

Voter turnout in Fort Whyte was high for a byelection at 44.4 per cent. This demonstrates how the opposition parties treated Fort Whyte as a constituency worth contesting rather than resigning themselves to the prospect of another PC victory.

Khan acknowledged the close margin in his victory speech.

"I want everyone to know in Fort Whyte that your message was heard loud and clear tonight," he said. 

(CBC News)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Bartley Kives

Senior reporter, CBC Manitoba

Bartley Kives joined CBC Manitoba in 2016. Prior to that, he spent three years at the Winnipeg Sun and 18 at the Winnipeg Free Press, writing about politics, music, food and outdoor recreation. He's the author of the Canadian bestseller A Daytripper's Guide to Manitoba: Exploring Canada's Undiscovered Province and co-author of both Stuck in the Middle: Dissenting Views of Winnipeg and Stuck In The Middle 2: Defining Views of Manitoba.

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