Manitoba

Flin Flon's new emergency room opening in April

Flin Flon is about to open an emergency department that is eight and a half times larger than the current space. 

14,000 sq. ft. expansion multitudes larger than current ER space

The Flin Flon General Hospital is the only hospital in the northern Manitoba community, but CBC News has learned that many people in the area are opting to drive for hours when they require medical attention, in order to avoid accessing the hospital for fear the care there is inadequate. (CBC)

Flin Flon is about to open an emergency room that's eight and a half times larger than their current department.

The provincial government announced on Monday the $27.1 million expansion will accept patients beginning Apr. 1. 

The enlarged 14,000 sq. ft. space includes four stretcher bays, two treatment rooms, a procedure room, a trauma room, a family consult room, an isolation room/gynecological room, an intravenous therapy room and improved patient access from ambulance to treatment areas, the province said in a news release.

The waiting room will have a dedicated area to handle patients who come into contact with hazardous substances, as well as a secure room for physically aggressive individuals.

"The previous ER was, shall we say, a challenge for people who were getting treatment there," Premier Brian Pallister said in an interview. "It was very confined, restrictive and tough on the people delivering the care, too. I know the staff will be really excited."

The project began in summer 2016 following demolition work. 

The Northern Regional Health Authority and community partners contributed $950,000 toward the cost.

"Our community, our region and all who live here and are served by this new emergency department will benefit from the results of this investment for years to come," CEO Helga Bryant said in a news release.

The Flin Flon General Hospital also provides care to Saskatchewan residents.

The health centre has faced scrutiny after suspending baby deliveries late last year because of low staffing. Before the delivery ward closed, briefing notes show the obstetrical department experienced "near misses" that were "greatly distressing" for staff members.

With files from Ramraajh Sharvendiran

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