Manitoba

First fat bike race cycles through Manitoba on Sunday

More than 85 cyclists participated in a fat bike race at Fort Whyte Alive on Sunday, and organizers say the event is the first of its kind in Manitoba.

Fat bikes are larger than typical mountain bikes, with wheels a minimum of 2.5 inches thick

Participants of Manitoba's first fat bike race gear up to hit the snow on the mountain bikes, which have thicker tires than regular mountain bikes. (CBC)

More than 85 cyclists participated in a fat bike race at Fort Whyte Alive on Sunday, and organizers say the event is the first of its kind in Manitoba.

Woodcock Cycle and 2 Wheel Revolution were behind the winter race.

The fat bike race took place among beautiful scenery at Fort Whyte Alive on Sunday. (CBC)

"What encouraged us … was to get a lot of people out and kind of get this sport organized because it is a bit of a different cycling sport," said Jackson Locken, one of the race's organizers, noting the race was called the Winnipeg Whyte Out. 

Jackson Locken, one of the organizers of Sunday's race, said participants could not have asked for nicer weather and the event was put on to celebrate an active winter lifestyle. (CBC)

"This was the first [fat bike race] in the province, first one in the city but there's really not a lot of events like this even in Canada so it's just to bring the community together," Locken said.

The goal of Sunday's race was to celebrate an active winter lifestyle, Locken said, and he said with no wind, participants couldn't have asked for better weather.

Two fat bike racers pedal through Fort Whyte Alive on Sunday. (CBC)

Fat bikes are larger than typical mountain bikes, with wheels a minimum of 2.5 inches thick, making it a stable ride, even in snow or over ice. According to race organizers, the bikes are growing in popularity in Manitoba.

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