Manitoba

Tories to release early version of report on Winnipeg's development practices next week

The Manitoba government is planning to release the findings of an interim report on development regulations in the City of Winnipeg in the coming days. 

Premier has argued economic growth is being stifled by a burdensome permitting process 

Recommendations from a review of permitting processes for a number of bodies, including the City of Winnipeg, is scheduled to be received by cabinet next week. (CBC)

The Manitoba government is planning to release the findings of an interim report on development regulations in the City of Winnipeg in the coming days. 

The recommendations come only weeks after the province announced an arm's-length body would study how fast construction projects are approved and inspected at the city. The review is also looking at land use and development practices in other municipalities, planning districts, Manitoba Hydro and the Office of the Fire Commissioner.

Premier Brian Pallister has argued economic growth is being stifled by a burdensome permitting process. 

Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman has questioned the impartiality of the review, which is being conducted by civil servants reporting to a committee of cabinet.

The province released a preliminary report on Wednesday explaining the parameters of the review, which so far includes interviews with around 50 developers, professional organizations, and current and former executives of Manitoba Hydro, the Office the Fire Commissioner, the City of Winnipeg, rural municipalities and planning districts.

A news release said the interim report would be finalized, and released publicly, next week. 

Pallister said any criticism of the review for being political couldn't be "further from the truth."

"For some unknown reason, people may want to prejudge the work," he told reporters Wednesday. "Have a look at the work. Give the report a look. Judge it on that basis. Don't start prejudging the work of an independent arm's-length group of civil servants before you've even read the work. That's not productive and it's not helpful."

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