Manitoba

Donors send hundreds of books to Shamattawa's school

People have sent around a thousand books to a remote First Nation's school library after all its books were ruined by mould.

First Nation's entire school library was destroyed by mould

People have sent around a thousand books to a remote First Nation's school library after all its books were ruined by mould.

Abraham Beardy Memorial School in Shamattawa, Man., had a leak that led to mould in the building. While the school is being rebuilt, it had to destroy all of its books due to health concerns. 

David Robertson is with Manitoba First Nations Education Resource Centre, which has been providing as many books as it can to the school. He was touched to see how many strangers donated books this week for students in Shamattawa.

"I think they're going to be thrilled. I don't know how they're feeling right now without them but I'm sure it's a struggle. But to me, books are magic and I'm sure this will open doors for them."

Many of the books were donated by CBC listeners and viewers after the school's principal spoke to CBC Manitoba last week. Robertson was encouraged to see the kindness arrive in the form of books.

"I just think there's a lot of negative feelings in Canada right now and this shows you something like this, when we come together we can do really great things."

The new school and library are expected to open in 2015. 

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