Manitoba

Dog roams Manitoba First Nation with trap on jaw for days

A stray dog is recovering in Winnipeg from serious physical trauma after having run around Manitoba's Peguis First Nation with a trap around his lower jaw for several days.

WARNING: This story contains graphic images

Smash Mouth is being cared for at D'Arcy's A.R.C., where staff say he is shy and reserved, but eating well on his own. (Supplied photo)

A stray dog that spent several days on Peguis First Nation with a trap around its lower jaw is recovering in Winnipeg.

A woman living on Peguis First Nation reported the dog to pet rescue officials on Nov. 6.

Following a number of attempts, the injured, scared and hungry dog was rescued on Nov. 12 and taken to a veterinary clinic in Gimli, where staff took off the trap and treated his wounds.

The dog went to Winnipeg's Birchwood Vet Hospital on Nov. 16, where a veterinarian removed necrotic tissue and assessed the wound for further trauma. The dog's lower jaw is still intact but it may need reconstructive surgery, the clinic said.

The dog is now at D'Arcy's A.R.C. for recovery. Staff, who named him Smash Mouth, said he is shy and reserved but eating well on his own.

"His true personality is blossoming with each day in care," said D'Arcy Johnston, the founder of D'Arcy's A.R.C.

There has been a spike this year in the number of animals with major injuries that Johnston and his staff are treating, he said.

"We see animals coming in with serious injuries that are both a result of accidents, like car accident injuries, and other more intentional actions," Johnston said.

"This reminds me of the dog Lemon Lime that we rescued with her throat cut last summer."

The problem is provincewide and not specific to one area in Manitoba, Johnston said.

He welcomes donations to help with Smash Mouth's care and critical care for other animals the clinic is treating.

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