Manitoba

Province announces $3M for Indigenous-led recovery centre to be built near Victoria Beach

Manitoba will provide $3 million to help build an Indigenous-led recovery centre where survivors of multi-generational trauma, sexual violence, sexual exploitation and human trafficking can get help.

Described as a healing village, centre will provide programs, supports based on Indigenous teachings

Elder Billie Schibler of the Clan Mothers group says the healing village will be guided by Indigenous knowledge and ceremony. (Fernand Detillieux/CBC )

Manitoba will provide $3 million to help build an Indigenous-led recovery centre where survivors of multi-generational trauma, sexual violence, sexual exploitation and human trafficking can get help.

The healing village will be led by women and guided by Indigenous teachings and ceremony, to offer a different kind of experience for participants, Elder Billie Schibler said at a news conference where the funding was announced Tuesday.

"We've suffered the pains that have brought us the knowledge that we carry … and it's from that knowledge that we will then be able to provide the guidance and help with the healing journey for those that need to come to a safe place," she said. 

"We need to do things right. We need to do things differently and we need to follow our traditional ways to do it."

The project is the vision of the Clan Mothers group, a collective of Indigenous women who have been working on making the centre a reality for several years. Schibler is a member of the Clan Mothers' elder council.

With residences and several services on site, the healing village will offer mid-term to long-term support to Indigenous women and gender diverse people as they rebuild their lives.

The healing village will be located just south of Victoria Beach, along Lake Winnipeg. The $3 million will go toward capital costs of building the healing village. 

The capital cost of the village is approximately $11 million.

The capital campaign only started in fall, yet $1.5 million has already been raised from individuals, businesses and community members.

Manitoba Premier Heather Stefanson, centre, poses for a photo with others involved in Tuesday's announcement. (Tyson Koschik/CBC)

Part of what will make the centre different from other recovery centres is that it will allow people to keep their families with them, so they don't have to decide whether to leave behind their children to seek treatment, Families Minister Rochelle Squires said.

"That's a heartbreaking decision for many women, and I know the Clan Mothers envision a place where women can heal with their children alongside them," she said. 

Construction on the healing village is to begin next spring.

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