CHAT REPLAY

CBC Manitoba election forum: Jobs and the economy

Four candidates from Manitoba's major political parties debated issues related to jobs and the economy on Thursday evening. See what the candidates said with our chat recap.

NDP, Liberal, PC and Green candidates debate on CBC-TV and in online forum

Four candidates from Manitoba's major political parties debated issues related to jobs and the economy on Thursday evening. 13:12

Manitoba New Democrats say the province has some of the best job creation statistics in the country, but the PCs, Liberals and Greens all say they can do better.

Four candidates from Manitoba's major political parties debated issues related to jobs and the economy on Thursday evening. See what the candidates said with our chat recap below.
Liberal Michelle Finley, left, Grant Sharp of the Green Party, Wab Kinew of the NDP and Tracey Maconachie of the Progressive Conservatives join the CBC’s Chris Glover for a debate on jobs and the economy on Thursday evening. (Marjorie Dowhos/CBC)

    The candidates were:

    • Wab Kinew, NDP candidate for Fort Rouge.
    • Michelle Finley, Liberal candidate for St. James.
    • Tracey Maconachie, PC candidate for River Heights.
    • Grant Sharp, Green candidate for Fort Rouge.

    All this week, CBC Manitoba is hosting a nightly debate on the election issues facing voters. Chris Glover will be joined by representatives of the political parties on CBC Television and online from 6:15 to 7 p.m., Monday to Friday. Join the live chat and engage with the parties and other voters by visiting cbc.ca/manitoba.

    This debate is in addition to, and does not replace, the leaders' debate that will be broadcast live on CBC Television on April 12.


    Candidates squared off about health care on Monday, education was the focus of Tuesday's debate and candidates pitched their infrastructure plans on Wednesday evening. 


    While the current NDP government boasts that the province's job growth rate is best in the country, they also have been running a deficit since 2009. 

    Should they be re-elected, the NDP promise to raise the minimum wage by 50 cents per year as well as close the Manitoba's gender pay gap. 

    The Progressive Conservatives are committing to expanding "businesses and add jobs to communities in northern Manitoba" along with investing "no less than $1 billion a year in strategic infrastructure with the goal of supporting economic growth."

    Both the Liberal and Green parties have made pledges toward a guaranteed minimum income plan paid by their government should they be elected. 

    The Liberals say this will eliminate a complex welfare system, and those that do not require the additional income will repay it through monthly payroll deductions. 

    The Greens say the extra earnings will be a refundable tax credit delivered through the income tax system, and put a number on the amount — $6,300 annually per adult Manitoban.

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