Manitoba

Brian Sinclair: Manitoba Nurses Union weighs in on inquest report

The Manitoba Nurses Union agrees with an inquest report that determined Brian Sinclair's death was preventable.

'The death was preventable entirely, and I think the system has to respond to that,' says union president

Brian Sinclair was 45 when he died waiting to be seen in the emergency room at Winnipeg's Health Sciences Centre. He was discovered dead 34 hours after he arrived. (Maurice Bruneau/Submitted by family)

The Manitoba Nurses Union agrees with the inquest report that determined Brian Sinclair's death was preventable.

Sandi Mowat, Manitoba Nurses Union president, said Sinclair, a double amputee, was failed by the system.

"I do think the death was preventable entirely, and I think the system has to respond to that," said Mowat. "I do think they have made some changes that will make things safer, and I think we have to continue working toward that."

Sinclair, 45, died after spending 34 hours waiting for care in the emergency room of Winnipeg's Health Science's Centre. The inquest report, released Friday, found Sinclair's death was "preventable," but not a homicide.

Sinclair's family believes he was ignored because he was aboriginal. His death was the product of "institutional racism and stereotyping" according to Robert Sinclair, Brian Sinclair's cousin.

Mowat said despite Sinclair's tragic death, the nurses at the Health Sciences Centre are always committed to providing quality health care to those admitted to the hospital's emergency room.

"I know those nurses choose to work at the Health Sciences Emergency, that's the community they choose to work in," said Mowat. "And I know their goal is always to deliver the best care they possibly can."

The inquest judge made 63 recommendations, many of which have already been implemented by the regional health authority.

Mowat said many are the same recommendations the nurse's union made in a past report to improve hospital care.

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