Manitoba

Brandon issues boil-water advisory west of 18th Street after significant water main break

Most people in the western half of Brandon, Man., have been advised to boil their water after a significant water main break led to low water pressure across a big part of the city.

Advisory affects west part of the city south of the Assiniboine River

A significant water main break led to low water pressure across large portions of the city of Brandon, Man. (Olivia Stefanovich/CBC)

Most people in the western half of Brandon, Man., have been advised to boil their water after a significant water main break led to low water pressure across a big part of the city.

In a boil-water advisory issued Monday morning, City of Brandon staff said they had identified and isolated the break.

Due to the significance of the break, the city issued a boil water advisory for areas south of the Assiniboine River and west of 18th Street, and extending to city limits.

Roughly 6,500 residential units and 240 commercial units are impacted, most of which just have low water pressure, said Patrick Pulak, the general manager of operations for the city.

"It's one thing to wake up as a resident and not have water, but now you've got daycares which cannot open without water supply. You've got businesses that count on that water supply. You get people driving to work who can't pick up their coffee in the morning," he said in an interview Monday.

A map of the city of Brandon shows all areas south of the Assoniboine River and west of 18th Street outlined in red, indicating the areas affected by a boil-water advisory.
This map shows the area covered by a boil-water advisory issued in Brandon on Monday. (Submitted by the City of Brandon)

Pulak says it was tough to find the source of the problem, and it took longer than it normally does to fix.

"Usually when there's a lot of main break, there's a resident telling us, 'Hey, there's water pouring out of my driveway' or 'What's on the street?' In this case, we had nothing. So it really took a bit of detective work to track down where it was," he said.

People are being advised to bring water to a rolling boil for at least one minute if using it for drinking or preparing beverages, including formula, ice-making, preparing food, washing fruits and vegetables or brushing teeth.

Pulak believes the water is safe, but it's being tested as a precaution.

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With files from Susan Magas

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