Manitoba

New all-weather road linking Berens River, Bloodvein to highways will open up economic opportunities: mayor

An all-weather road linking two Manitoba First Nations and the provincial highway network is now complete.

'The completion of this road is something our community has been eagerly anticipating': Berens River chief

The 70-kilometre road on the east side of Lake Winnipeg connects Berens River with the Bloodvein First Nation and includes three bridges. (Jarrod Boscow/Twitter)

An all-weather road linking two Manitoba First Nations and the provincial highway network is now complete.

The 70-kilometre road on the east side of Lake Winnipeg connects Berens River with the Bloodvein First Nation and includes three bridges.

Infrastructure Minister Ron Schuler says the permanent road will improve people's lives.

Schuler, Chief Hartley Everett of the Berens River First Nation and Mayor Allan Atlookan of the Berens River Northern Affairs Community announced today that the road is open for business.

Schuler says First Nations communities were contracted for clearing land and producing gravel as part of the road's construction.

On Tuesday, it was announced that the road was open for business. (Jarrod Boscow/Twitter)

Atlookan says the road will open up economic and tourism opportunities for the community.

"The completion of this road is something our community has been eagerly anticipating," Everett said.

"There are always challenges for winter road travel in the spring and fall, but the completion of this road will provide year-round travel for our community."

Bloodvein First Nation is approximately 215 kilometres north of Winnipeg and 70 kilometres south of Berens River First Nation.

Chief Hartley Everett of Berens River First Nation, left, Infrastructure Minister Ron Schuler, centre, and Mayor Allan Atlookan of the Berens River Northern Affairs Community. (Jarrod Boscow/Twitter)