Police HQ builder fires back at co-defendant in City of Winnipeg lawsuit

The contractor that built the downtown Winnipeg police headquarters says if the City of Winnipeg suffered losses on the $214-million project, it was in part because of the consultant's negligence.

Caspian claims if city suffered losses in police HQ project, it was due to consultant's negligence

Winnipeg police headquarters builder Caspian Projects denies allegations contained in a city lawsuit, and has filed legal action against its co-defendant Adjeleian Allen Rubeli Ltd. (CBC)

The contractor that built the downtown Winnipeg police headquarters says if the City of Winnipeg suffered losses on the $214-million construction project, it was in part because of the consultant's negligence. 

Caspian Projects Inc. made the allegations on Aug. 1 in a Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench cross-claim against Adjeleian Allen Rubeli Ltd. (AAR) — its co-defendant in a City of Winnipeg civil suit.

In May the city sued Caspian and AAR for damages resulting from their work on the police headquarters. In court documents, the city claimed more than 40 deficiencies were discovered in the building after officers moved into it two years ago.

It alleged the problems included a lack of adequate fire protection, improper drainage and a deteriorating structural slab the city alleged wasn't addressed during the three-year construction project.

Both Caspian and AAR have denied any wrongdoing. 

Two weeks ago, AAR filed its statement of defence and cross-claim against Caspian, asking the courts to hold Caspian responsible in the event a judge rules in the city's favour. 

In response, Caspian is seeking compensation for damages and court costs from AAR.

About the Author

Caroline Barghout

Reporter, CBC Manitoba

Caroline began her career co-hosting an internet radio talk show in Toronto and then worked at various stations in Oshawa, Sudbury and Toronto before landing in Winnipeg in 2007. Since joining CBC Manitoba as a reporter in 2013, she has won an award for her work on crowded jails and her investigation into Tina Fontaine's death led to changes in the child welfare system. Email: caroline.barghout@cbc.ca