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What lessons came when Frances Elizabeth Moore hosted London Morning

Frances Elizabeth Moore, of Timiskaming First Nation, moved to London nearly 16 years ago and has become a passionate, local advocate for Indigenous people. On National Indigenous Peoples Day, CBC London invited Moore to take the reins of the radio program, London Morning.

Moore called the show 'a love letter to her community'

CBC London invited longtime Indigenous advocate Frances Elizabeth Moore to co-host London Morning on National Indigenous Peoples Day. (Rebecca Zandbergen/CBC News)

Frances Elizabeth Moore, of Timiskaming First Nation, moved to London nearly 16 years ago and has become a passionate, local advocate for Indigenous people. On National Indigenous Peoples Day, CBC London invited Moore to take the reins of London Morning

Moore selected and interviewed all of Monday's guests and assembled an all-local Indigenous playlist. She called the two-and-half-hour show, a 'love letter to her community.'

Listen to the show below or continue reading for a quick take on some of the biggest lessons from the program.

Get rid of the word 'Aboriginal'

Sara Mai Chitty is the Indigenous Curriculum and Pedagogy Advisor at Western University. (Western University)

Sara Mai Chitty, an Anishinaabekwe storyteller, educator and member of Alderville First Nation, is currently Western University's Indigenous Curriculum and Pedagogy Advisor.

"Indigenous is the best word to use. With a capital I." Get rid of the word Aboriginal, she added.

Want to be an ally? Find 5 more people to be one too

Eva Jewell is from Chippewas of the Thames and an assistant professor at Ryerson University. An institution Jewell now calls 'X' University. (Ryerson University)

Eva Jewell, associate fellow at the Yellowhead Institute, a First Nation-led research centre based at Ryerson University, has been tracking the federal government's progress in implementing the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's 94 recommendations. 

Progress has been slow and largely performative, said Jewell.

So how can non-Indigenous Canadians be better allies to Indigenous people? 

"They need to be open to hearing the truth and they need to bring each other along on that," said Jewell. "So if you're a Canadian and you know the issues and you're very passionate, you need to bring five more people who aren't passionate with you. So that's something that you could help us do."

If an Indigenous boy has long hair, he's proudly participating in his culture

Adam Sturgeon is the frontman of the band, Status/Non-Status. He's also a good friend of Frances Elizabeth Moore. (Vivian Rashotte/CBC)

Status/Non-Status frontman, Adam Sturgeon's preschool-aged son, Oda has long hair and is often asked if he's a girl.

"We have to teach them to speak up for themselves," Sturgeon said. "In our culture, our hair is our connection to the earth, and our men have long hair, and that's the way it is."

"We only cut our hair for certain purposes. That means that we're participating in our culture and our way. It's important to do that."

Representation at schools matters for Indigenous kids too

Longtime teacher Robyn Michaud with Frances Elizabeth Moore's son, Drake (Bear) on Solidarity Day in 2018. (Frances Elizabeth Moore)

Longtime public school teacher Robyn Michaud currently teachers Grade 6 at Central Public School in Woodstock, with the Thames Valley District School Board, and is hopeful there will soon be more Indigenous teachers and staff in schools.

"I've taught a lot of kids who've told me they don't see themselves as part of the school because they don't see other people that look like them, especially in roles of leadership," said Michaud.

"I feel the same way," she add. "When I see an Indigenous students in the school. It's that instant connection and that feeling like you're home."

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