London

'The anger is getting louder:' vegan Londoner

Abby McCuaig is still shaken after facing another angry motorist who got aggressive while she was on her way to pick up one of her boys from hockey. McCuaig believes her animal rights bumper stickers, that also support what she calls a vegan and compassionate life style, are the source of the aggression.

A London-area woman is thinking of removing her vegan bumper stickers after angry drivers get aggressive.

Abby McCuaig is considering removing some of her bumper stickers after facing aggressive motorists in London and on area highways. (submitted/Abby McCuaig)

Abby McCuaig is still shaken and tearful after facing another angry motorist who got aggressive while she was on her way to pick up one of her boys from hockey. She said the driver verbally assaulted her and nearly ran her off the road.

"The guy just kind of pulled up really, really close beside me and yelled really offensive ..." she said before tears started to flow. "I'm sorry. I'm still emotional about it."

McCuaig believes her animal rights bumper stickers, that support what she calls a vegan and compassionate life style, are the source of the aggression. 

She has about a dozen stickers on her vehicle with captions such as, "If you love animals you don't eat them" or "Be kind, be vegan".

Not the first time

McCuaig said other motorists have thrown meat and other debris such as metal and garbage at her car. 

"It's just getting to the point where it's really affecting my safety and my mental health," she said.

McCuaig is grateful the incidents have never happened while the children were with her but she's concerned the anger is "... getting louder."

"I grew up in farming country so you know I understand where they're coming from if that's their first introduction to a vegan or compassionate lifestyle," she said. "They might take it the wrong way."

Online support

McCuaig said she has received a lot of support since she told her story on Facebook. A couple of people said they had seen the back of her car with all the stickers and taken selfies.

"I definitely get people who will stop me in a parking lot and say they love my bumper stickers, or something like that."

But, McCuaig is getting more and more concerned about driving in London and on area highways.

"I've been blocked in by truckers on the highway and honked at/flipped off more times than I could count. Lately, I don't feel safe driving alone and often avoid areas of high traffic unless someone is in the car with me," she posted online.

McCuaig is considering removing the stickers she believes are most triggering for those who don't share her views, just to prevent future incidents.

"I just want to make the world a better place," she said. "It's getting angrier. I'm definitely going to be installing front and rear dash-cams for my own safety."