London

Mackie to defend fluoridation at civic works committee

London's medical officer of health will make a case this afternoon for continuing the use of fluoride in London drinking water, saying there's no proof it causes disease while citing evidence that it prevents cavities.

London's chief medical officer says cities that have cancelled fluoride have seen more cavities

London's medical officer of health says city fluoridation programs have improved dental health outcomes. (CBC)

London's medical officer of health will make a case this afternoon for continuing the use of  fluoride in London drinking water, saying there's no proof it causes disease while citing evidence that it prevents cavities. 

Dr. Chris Mackie, who also heads the Middlesex-London Health Unit, is on the agenda as a speaker at Tuesday afternoon's civic works committee.

But so are a handful of fluoridation opponents are also expected to speak.

In his written submission, Mackie points to other cities that have stopped fluoridation only to see the number of cavities increase, including Calgary and Juneau, Alaska.

London has added fluoride to its water since 1967 and Mackie says stopping it now could mean at least 40,000 additional cavities for London children over the next 10 years.

The issue is coming to committee now because a delegation of fluoride opponents came before the committee under the previous council, who referred the matter to the council elected last fall.

Windsor voted to resume fluoridation last month after stopping it back in 2013.

Mackie's report cites provincial statistics that say about 70 per cent of Ontario residents receive fluoridated water.  

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