London

London police officers used naloxone to save 57 people last year

London police are urging anyone who could overdose or their friends and family to get a free naloxone kit.

Numbers from the police force cover 7 months since the kits were issued to officers in 2018

London police service officers were trained and provided naloxone kits in June 2018. (David Gunn/CBC)

London's police officers used the overdose-reversing drug naloxone on 59 people since they were trained to use the kits. 

Of those people, all but two survived, London police said in a statement. 

"Fentanyl and other opioids continue to be a significant issue in London. We are going to these types of calls too often but, fortunately, we have been able to help a significant number of people," said Deputy Chief Steve Williams. 

Officers, cadets and special constables were trained to use naloxone and were issued the kits on June 4. 

They used the kits 96 times, sometimes needing to use multiple doses on someone who was overdosing, police said. 

"Due to concerns about an increase in the fentanyl-related overdoses that London Police officers are responding to, members began carrying naloxone kits to ensure they are able to provide immediate assistance if exposed to fentanyl or to provide immediate assistance to someone who has overdosed," Williams said. 

Police urge anyone who could overdose or their friends and family to get a free naloxone kit.

The kits are available at pharmacies and community groups.