London

Intense snow squalls coming for London region

You might not have your snow tires on your vehicle, your studded tires on your bike, or your winter gear out of storage, but Mother Nature doesn't really care about that.

Snow squalls are forecast to develop over Lake Huron this afternoon and shift south this evening

Environment Canada is forecasting intense snow squalls for the London region. (Kate Dubinski/CBC News)

You might not have your snow tires on your vehicle, your studded tires on your bike, or your winter woolies out of storage, but Mother Nature doesn't really care about that. 

Ready or not, Londoners woke up to snow lightly falling this morning, with "intense snow squalls" forecast into Friday for the city as well as Parkhill, Stathroy, Komoka, and eastern and western Middlesex County. 

The squalls will develop over central Lake Huron Thursday afternoon and shift southward into the London region this evening. 

"The snow squalls are expected to be particularly intense tonight before slowly weakening through the day Friday," Environment Canada has warned, issuing a snow squall warning. 

"Locally heavy snow and strong winds are expected to result in reduced visibility and difficult travel conditions at times." 

City prepares

London's fleet of sand and salt trucks were out checking major roads and bridges at 5:00 a.m. Thursday, according to John Parsons, Division Manager of Transportation and Roadside Operations.

"In addition to that, we're mounting our front and wing plows on our 28 city plow trucks," he said. "We're watching the system right now and we'll see what it brings." 

The system is expected to bring as much as 25 cm of snow by Thursday night and another 15 cm on Friday, according to Environment Canada. That combined with 30-50 km/hr winds could significantly reduce visibility for motorists.

"That's certainly enough to get the snow moving around," said meteorologist Brian Owsiak. "Any kind of wind combined with that amount of snow is going to reduce visibility to quite low so it would make travel difficult."

Police are asking motorists to slow down and drive to the conditions.

"A common cause of winter time crashes is 'Speed too fast for conditions,'" said an OPP news release.

"If you see snow, go slow." 

Amico worker Andrew Morrison shovels snow on Dundas Place. (Kate Dubinski/CBC News)