London

Temperatures set to plunge overnight, health authorities issue season's first cold alert

The sharpest cold of the winter so far has prompted London health authorities to issue the first cold weather alert of the season as temperatures are set to plunge overnight Thursday to a chilly -15 C. 

The mercury is expected to nose dive Thursday night to -15 C with the wind making it feel like -23 C

Forecasters predict London will be dangerously cold overnight Thursday with temperatures dropping to a low of -15 C and the wind making it feel much colder. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

The sharpest cold of the winter so far has prompted London health authorities to issue the first cold weather alert of the season as temperatures are set to plunge overnight Thursday to a chilly -15 C. 

The cold air mass will bring with it winds of up to 50 km/h Thursday night, according to Environment Canada, making it feel as cold as -23 C.

London will likely stay locked in the coldest embrace of the winter so far until Saturday, when after-dark temperatures return to single-digits. 

The frigid air likely won't break any records, but it's cold enough to prompt health authorities to warn those working or sleeping outside to dress in layers, cover exposed flesh and find shelter in order to avoid the blistering cold and with it, potential frostbite or hypothermia. 

Symptoms of frostbite include red or blue skin, turning greyish white in severe cases, along with pain, numbness and stiffness, especially in extremities such as fingers and toes.

Health authorities recommend if you suspect frostbite to place the affected area near warmer skin or immerse it in warm water. 

In the case of hypothermia, where symptoms include pale skin, drowsiness, confusion and hallucinations, health authorities recommend immediate medical attention. 

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