London

Some of the best tweets from last night's BRT meeting

While city councillors carved up what could have been the largest infrastructure project in London's history, many took to Twitter with their own commentary. Here are some memorable tweets.

At a city committee meeting, city politicians voted on future transit projects for London

Instead of putting it forward as one cohesive project, London city staff have broken out the $500 million BRT plan into its component parts. Each route has also been renamed. The Wellington Road leg, for example, is now called the 'Wellington Road Gateway.' Following last night's vote, (Shift BRT)

While city councillors carved up what could have been the largest infrastructure project in London's history, many took to Twitter with their own commentary. 

The debate about the $500-million bus rapid transit project has been going on for years, but has ramped up in the last few months as the debate dominated the municipal election campaign in the fall and came to a head last night at a city committee meeting. 

Here are some memorable tweets:

At the outset of the debate, some felt like it had been going on for a very long time

 

Before the main part of the meeting got underway last night, there was a long debate about scrapping dedicated bus lanes and instead making high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes. That idea was eventually nixed. 

The debate was watched at home, with many people in the public gallery, and by Londoners from afar. 

And many saw it as a class divide, after the north and west legs of the cut-up project failed to get enough votes to go ahead, while parts in the south (on Wellington) and east did. 

The whole thing frustrated a lot of people

After the marathon debate, at least one Twitter user figured if you can't have a rapid transit project, at least you can sing about it (and what better than the tune to a Beatles song)

If you were wondering if the sky had fallen overnight, never fear. 

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