London·Photos

Get one last look at these 5 London eyesores before the city has them demolished

Officials with the City of London want to demolish five derelict homes because of recurring problems with squatters, pests and rising enforcement costs.

The 5 crumbling homes have become safe havens for squatters and pests

One of the five buildings slated for demolition by the City of London. (Colin Butler/CBC News)

Officials with the City of London want to demolish five derelict homes because of recurring problems with squatters, pests and rising enforcement costs.

The homes, the majority of which are close to the downtown, are neighbourhood eyesores with overgrown yards, broken windows and in some cases collapsing roofs and floors. 

Besides being ugly, they're dangerous, according to city officials. Serving as a safe haven for insects, vermin and even squatters, looking for shelter from the elements. 

All of them are subject to numerous enforcement orders by the City of London that their owners have ignored, that officials have finally had enough and have ordered them torn down for the good of the community. 

533 Piccadilly Street

This two-storey home at 533 Piccadilly Street is overgrown and the property is scattered with litter and other debris. There is also a large insect nest above the second-storey window. (Colin Butler/CBC News)

200 Adelaide Street North

This building at 200 Adelaide Street North is infested with vermin, according to city hall documents. The building is owned by an investment firm. (Colin Butler/CBC News)

8 Henry Street

The owner of this abandoned home at 8 Henry Street in London's SoHo neighbourhood has not complied with a number of orders from city enforcement officials. (Colin Butler/CBC News)

315 Oakland Avenue

This home at 315 Oakland Avenue in East London has been derelict for sometime and city officials have unsuccessfully ordered the owner to repair its roof, porch and floors. (Colin Butler/CBC News)

271 William Street

The paint is peeling at this home at 271 William Street and its fallen into such disrepair that saplings have begun sprouting from its eaves. (Colin Butler/CBC News)

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