Food tossed at cyclist ... for the second time

Cedric Richards, 26, was struck by two eggs while biking from Cherryhill Mall to his home in the Pond Mills area.

"It felt cold, like a snow ball or an ice ball. It felt really sticky"

Cedric Richards, 26, was struck by two eggs while biking from Cherryhill Mall to his home in the Pond Mills area.

 It was an unexpected blow to his calf that forced Cedric Richards to come to a full stop when he was cycling home from work on Tuesday evening.

"It felt cold, like a snow ball or an ice ball. It felt really sticky," said Richards. "Then, I saw egg shells on the back of my bike (and calf)."

The 26-year-old suspected his regular bike 40 minute ride from Cherryhill Mall to his home in the Pond Mills area was interrupted by a group of people chucking eggs nearby.

"Usually it's people who have mocked me solely for being on a bicycle," he said.  "It's the idea that the car is the king in the city. It's that superiority when it comes to modes of transportation."

He's unsure whether the eggs were thrown from inside a car or a home. However, Richards said some motorists aren't keen on sharing the road with cyclists, who are often viewed as non-vehicles.

"Biking is not normalized," he said. "There's a stigma in general for non-car modes of transportation."

It's not the first time Richards was a victim of food tossing.

Two years ago, he had an apple thrown at him while he was biking to work.

Cedric Richards, 26, has been previously struck by apples while cycling from his home in Pond Mills to London's east end. (Hala Ghonaim/CBC)

Cycling visibility

Eric Shepperd is a member of Critical Mass, a cycling group that often congregates in large numbers to increase the visibility of biking in the city.

"We need to be making room for one another," he said. "The more cyclists are visible on the road, the more visible we become, the harder to ignore cyclists will become."

Shepperd said a spike in development across the city has made London less bike and pedestrian friendly.

"It's the big subdivisions, big block centres, parking lots and four lane roads," he said. "But, it's not a simple problem of changing the way we build. We need to change the mentality of our very society."

He encouraged commuters to choose bike lanes instead of the roadways as a mode of transportation to increase awareness surrounding biking in the city.

As for Richards, whether it's an egg or an apple, nothing has stopped him from strapping on his helmet.

"Make yourself existent," he said.