Should this bridge be renamed after a London music great?

A petition has been launched to name three London bridges after some of the city’s biggest names in music.

A petition is circulating to rename 3 bridges in honour of Priscilla Wright, Garth Hudson and Jack Richardson

There is a movement to rename the bridge that spans the forks of the Thames after the late music producer Jack Richardson (Nathan Holth)

A petition has been launched to name three London bridges after some of the city's biggest names in music.

James Reaney of the Jack Richardson London Music Awards committee told CBC's London Morning Wednesday they want to continue a tradition that honours Guy Lombardo with the Guy Lombardo Bridge on Wonderland Road and Tommy Hunter with Tommy Hunter Way, located near the childhood home of the country music star.

Garth Hudson of The Band

The committee wants to recognize the contributions of Priscilla Wright, who sprung to fame with a hit song in 1955 at the age of 14,  Garth Hudson of The Band, and Jack Richardson, best known as the producer of the Guess Who.

Reaney said they would like to see the bridges on Richmond Street north named for Hudson and Wright, and the bridge on Queen's Avenue near Museum London bear Richardson's name.

Wright's hit song, Man In a Raincoat, was recorded at the London radio studios of CFPL with her father Don and his septet providing back-up vocals. The song was so popular, she was invited to sing it on the Ed Sullivan Show in July, 1955.
Singer Priscilla Wright

Hudson was born in Windsor in 1937 but grew up in London after his family moved to the city around 1940. Hudson was with The Band in 1968 when they recorded their seminal debut album, Music From Big Pink.  He continued to perform with The Band in the '80s and '90s.

The late Jack Richardson performed with many of Canada's big orchestras in the 1950s. In 1968, he founded Nimbus  9 Productions and signed the first artist, The Guess Who. Richardson also worked as a producer for Alice Cooper, Bob Seger, Haygood Hardy and the Canadian Brass, among many others.

Music producer Jack Richardson

Reaney said  he's hoping for "a chorus of mighty approval" from Londoners to rename the three bridges. He said he doesn't have a particular number in mind at this point but is looking for what city administrators refer to as "a critical mass…hundreds, thousands, we'll accept it."

Reaney said he's encouraged by the support he has received local politicians including Phil Squire, Maureen Cassidy and Mayor Matt Brown.

Londoners can sign the petition at https://www.ipetitions.com/petition/bridging-our-music-history.